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  1. page home edited ... ENN102 for 2012 {Pic2.jpg} 2015 {Option2.jpg} Well done to all the ENN101 and ENN102…

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    ENN102 for 2012
    {Pic2.jpg}
    2015
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    Well done to all the ENN101 and ENN102 students who successfully passed these tough modules during 2014- some achieving well-earned distinctions!!
    In 2015 this site will continue to operate and I will be on-hand to assist you where I can; from assignments to poetry or discussions about the various texts connected to these modules.
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    12:08 am
  2. file Option2.jpg uploaded
    12:07 am
  3. page home edited ... WELCOME TO ENN101 & ENN102 for 2012 {Pic2.jpg} ... modules during 2012 - 2014- som…
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    WELCOME TO ENN101 & ENN102 for 2012
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    modules during 2012 -2014- some achieving
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    distinctions!!
    In 20132015 this site
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    will be onhandon-hand to assist
    If there is anything SPECIFIC you would like me to add to these pages, please let me know...
    Contact me on: lscheepers@varsitycollege.co.za and I will be happy to help in any way I can...Liesl
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    12:06 am

Tuesday, November 19

  1. page Poetry Pages edited ... had a few requests request for assistance with 'Deaf-and-Dumb School' 'Alexandra' by …

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    had a few requestsrequest for assistance with 'Deaf-and-Dumb School''Alexandra' by Anthony DeliusWally Serote which I
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    (see below). I have also included a suggested guideline for the assignment on Arthur Nortjie's poem IN EXILE...
    "In my Craft or Sullen Art" - Dylan Thomas (pg. 231) ADDED
    "Let me not to the marriage of true minds" - Shakespeare (pg. 23) ADDED
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    Alexandra (pg. 207/8)
    Wally Mongane Serote
    Serote's poems about places, particularly his Alexandra poems, grapple with the problems of squalor, violence, death, destitution, exploitation and the Black People’s quest for identity and a sense of community. InIn the poem
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    (the place) is forever connected to the speaker, just like a mother wouldwill be forever connected to her child.the speaker; it has shaped who he is and regardless of where he goes, he will carry the indelible impression of Alexandra with him. The personification of Alexandra (the place) as a mother-figure allows
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    has with thethis place; wherever
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    deep within him - it has made him whohim, the throb that he is.says “is silent in (his) heartbeat”, because it is his heartbeat. He was raised and nourished on
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    dongas" and because of this, Alexandra will forever live within him. Even as an adult he yearns for Alexandra; when he
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    out for this 'mother', thisAlexandra, although he knows that what should be the nurturing breast of his mother who frightens himwill only leave the taste of dust in his mouth.
    The speaker’s relationship with Alexandra is a potent mix of love
    and whomfear; despite the cruelty that lurks only just beneath the surface, he suspectscannot help but return to be cruel.her time and again. Line 17 perfectly captures the speaker’s inner turmoil where the name of this ‘mother’ he loves and fears in equal measure sits alongside a place synonymous with damnation: his ‘Alexandra’, his ‘hell’. He struggles with the notion that this relationship has somehow stripped him of his humanity because, although he has “seen people”, he feels that he is not one himself. He repeatedly pleads for answers from thishis 'mother'; "Do
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    not receiving any answers he simply cannot leave although others have distanced themselves from the memories and walked over himsever ties; he feels that he has “sunk(en) to gosuch meekness” because he has allowed people moving on to "far places".places" to walk over him. He has not stopped them from leaving and he has not left with them either.
    In line 25 he seems to resign himself to the simple truth when he says “Alexandra, I love you”. It
    is a product of his roots, helove that is not forged from logic or intellect; it is a love that scares him and can break him down, but it is also a love that has been shaped by this 'mother' Alexandra,him and he acknowledges that incontinues to be his heartbeat – the endvery thing that keeps him alive! In the final stanza he appears to have reached a sense of acceptance that no matter where he goes there will always find his way backcome a time when “all these worlds become funny” to herhim and he will return to willingly lie amid the rubble, back to the beginning, "simple and
    {http://www.ohiohistorycentral.org/images/hart-crane.jpg}
    My Grandmother's Love Letters (pg.130)
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    ENN101D
    Assignment 01
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    (Arthur Nortje)
    Question 1
    As a coloured man growing up in apartheid South Africa, Nortje felt an increasing sense of isolation and alienation. While the politics of this country made no allowance for a racially mixed and culturally hybrid young man, his father’s rejection of him was an added source of depression.
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    (1979. p.1).
    The title of this poem, “In Exile” speaks literally to the fact that he is in a strange land, but also to his state of mind and personal sense of exile: disconnected and dislocated emotionally.
    Question 2
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    The political situation in South Africa under apartheid led to a number of clashes between those who stood in defiance of the rule of law and those who were deployed to suppress any resistance. The armed forces and the police were militant in their handling of any suspected uprising and the recollection of ‘the boots’ clearly refer to the boots worn by the army and other special forces who were active at the time. Referring to the boots in the plural (although even one pair would be plural) creates a sense that there were many boots that ‘hollowed’ out his heart; an incessant march of stomping boots that flattened everything in their path.
    Question 6
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    is highlighted.
    Question 7
    ‘Benign’ means ‘friendly’ or ‘not harmful’; the cloud that obscures the sun in the final line of the poem is very different to the threatening storm clouds of the first stanza. Although he is a far distance, both literally and figuratively, from the brewing ‘storm’ clouds he recalls from home there is still a cloud, however harmless, that blocks the sun and casts him in shadow. He is unable to feel the warmth normally associated with the sun; instead all he is able to experience is an ever present ‘hunger’.
    Question 8
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    1998: 167-170).
    “My vacant self confronts the window.
    Day's rain slants its wires
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    For dusk has intervened: I draw the curtain
    and shift my numb lumped loins across the parquet.”
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    he feels.
    In the first stanza he notes the “open skies”; skies so vast that they stir in him a vague sense of anxiety. This feeling of anxiety takes him back to a time when “Nimbus wisps” of another kind were gathering; a time of political instability that was brewing in South Africa in the early 1960’s. The poet is transported back to a time when the winds were gathering and “sweeping between the towers” and the incessant march of boots, and the oppression they symbolised, was crushing enough to leave his heart “hollowed”.
    He is brought back to the present as the wind makes his clothing “gather and play” around his limbs. The lightheartedness of the moment is lost as his thoughts return to “transient streetscapes” and the blue sky of a “wind-beautiful day”. He keeps returning to these images of home, gradually “creating (a) paradise” in his mind. There is a sense that he yearns for this paradise; as for an “estranged lover” (Dameron (1976) cited in MJF Chapman (1979. p.1). It seems that without these memories he may become untethered; unless he is able to return to this ‘lover’, albeit through memory only, he will not survive the exile he finds himself in. Although he believes that “the soul decays in exile” he is still acutely aware that he never truly belonged in this ‘paradise’ he recalls with longing; as a coloured man he was the “wrong pigment” and for that reason would always have to deal with limitations based on racial and political ideologies. Not wanting to venture into these darker recesses of his past he opts to block this particular “channel of memory” and instead “build (himself) a picture of the sea”. In that moment he is once again transported to the place where he was born and the feeling of the grains of sand, “stirred by finger”, and softly blown away by the breeze in much the same way that the images he recalls are more spindrift than they are real.
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    References:
    Arthur, D. 1973. Arthur Kenneth Nortje, Poet and Teacher. Cited in: New Coin Poetry: Lonely Against the Light 9(3&4): 8-18.
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    Rhodes University.
    Dameron,

    Dameron,
    C. (1976).
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    Rhodes University.
    Klopper, D. Ed (2000). Anatomy of Dark: Collected Poems. Pretoria. UNISA Press.
    {http://www.nai.uu.se/_internal/cimg!0/jtjmo95zf5xlbhp29qrb3zth61faicu}
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    12:56 am

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